Slipknot Guitarists Jim Root + Mick Thomson Speak To Working Through Mental Health Struggles Over The Pandemic

slipknots-jim-root-mick-thompson-speak-to-mental-health-over-pandemic
Jim Root & Mick Thompson: Slipknot Facebook
Published on:

During a recent conversation with Guitar World, Slipknot guitarists Jim Root and Mick Thomson spoke to mental health struggles they both endured over the course of the pandemic.

At one point during this interview, Root is asked if picking up a guitar helped him take his mind off the state of the world during the pandemic; it is here where the Slipknot guitarist speaks to his mental health struggles over the course of the pandemic.

”No, guitars were depressing me. Everything was depressing me. It’s weird how the wires in your brain will cross up and whereas previously the guitar was an outlet for me to escape stuff, this time when I looked at it, it just reminded me of all the things that I wasn’t able to do because of Covid. So, this positive force in my life turned into this negative thing, which would’ve been absolutely fucking horrifying if I hadn’t been able to pull myself out of it.

“Now I pick up a guitar and I’m like, ‘What would I do without this?’ But back then, I was so far from that place. I was losing any sense of positivity. I had zero purpose at all. And I thought, ‘What difference does it make if I’m here or if I’m not here? What good is my existence? I’ve pretty much accomplished everything in life that I’ve set out to accomplish. How do I set new goals and why should I bother?’ That’s what was going through my head and it was scary.”

Jim later on spoke to how he was able to find some stability in his life:

“Finally, I got depressed enough and dark enough and sick enough of my own shit that I reached out for help and started seeing a therapist. And that really helped. They say men only seek out therapy as a necessity. They won’t go unless it’s their last resort.”

Mick then shares how he struggled with depression, and then later on spoke to what is therapeutic for him:

“It’s always therapeutic for me to be doing something with guitars. I’ve got pedals all over my dining room table. There’s guitars all over the floor. I just work on shit and experiment and play. […] “It’s not, ‘Oh, look. Employment. Guitar.’ During quarantine, I spent hours and hours on that to get everything dialed in right. I played a bunch for sure, but my mental getaway comes from fixing shit and modifying stuff.”

We hope that both Jim and Mick are in a much happier places today.