Dana Dentata Releases Marilyn Manson-esque Single “DO U LIKE ME NOW?”

We’re big fans of the artsy, sexy, disturbing female-empowerment-rap of Canadian songwriter Dana Dentata. Apparently, we’re not alone, as Dana only recently got signed to Roadrunner Records after livestreaming a full display of her bloody, unsettling performance art. Now, Dana’s dropped a new single, titled “DO U LIKE ME NOW?” and one listen proves why she’s garnered the praise of everyone from Kanye West to Marilyn Manson.

The track is very much in keeping with Dana’s previous music, though it goes hard and deep on some jarring and unpleasant subject matter. A lyric like, “Too drunk to say no — it must have been a dream/I’ll just go away without making a scene” delves into a topic that too many women are all too familiar with. That, plus the bizarre two-faced clown version of her on the single cover, make us wonder if Dana is going to be the new queen of honest shock rock, horrifying people with the ugly, traumatic truth rather than just a bunch of stuck-out tongues and curse words.

Listen to “DO U LIKE ME NOW?” below and feel either understood and empowered or offended and defensive:

“DO U LIKE ME NOW?” comes from Dana Dentata’s upcoming new album, the brilliantly-titled Pantychrist. Expected to arrive next year, Dentata has been finalizing work on Pantychrist, collaborating in the studio with artists / producers: Dylan Brady of 100 Gecs, Kris Esfandiari of King Woman/Miserable, Robokid, Yawns and Fish Narc of GothbBoiClique, and more.

On top of all that, Dana is set to feature in the genre-stretching horror/musical podcast, Halloween In Hellwhich will premiere October 10th via all podcast platforms.

If you missed Dana’s livestream from last night, check it out right now — it’s sexy, disturbing, beautiful, blasphemous, and cool as hell. It definitely bodes well for her work on Roadrunner, and makes her one of the artists to watch in the coming year:

Keep your eyes peeled for Dana’s new album Pantychrist in the coming year.

***

Words by Chris Krovatin