Four Stroke Baron’s Kirk Witt: 5 Surprising Albums I Love

Four Stroke Baron, 2019

Reno, Nevada, progressive alt-metal weirdos Four Stroke Baron do not play by the rules. Actually, they might not even know the rules. The trio — vocalist-guitarist Kirk Witt, bassist Keegan Ferrari and drummer Matt Vallarino — released the ambitious and adventurous LP Planet Silver Screen in late 2018 and have winning over slack-jawed fans ever since. Think Mastodon if the band were made up of new wave cyborgs, the album is a roller coaster of synthpop crooning, tangled riffage, atmospheric electronics and a guest “blackjazz” saxophone solo by Shining’s Jørgen Munkeby. Considering the far-reaching range of insane sounds all over the record, we knew that the band members must have wide and eclectic tastes, so we connected with Witt to find out some of the maybe not-so-surprising-after-all albums that he loves.

BARBRA STREISAND – THE BROADWAY ALBUM

This album is surprisingly intense. Some of the ballads I don’t care for, but the faster-paced songs like “Putting It Together” are pretty chaotic.

DJ BOBO – 25 YEARS: GREATEST HITS

An extremely European and generic Nineties dance album. There isn’t much talent behind it, and the lyrics sound like they were ran through Google translate … but I can’t look away.

TRAVIS SCOTT – “RODEO”

I’m a sucker for atmospheric trap music.

LIMP BIZKIT – SIGNIFICANT OTHER

This album was at the peak of commercial metal, and so much money and expertise went into the production of this album. I don’t know if you could make something sound much better, sonically. And say what you want about Limp Bizkit — but their rhythm section can groove pretty hard.

JOHN BROWN’S BODY – AMPLIFY

White boy reggae that I’d totally dance to at a wine walk in Napa when I’m 40.