Northlane’s Brendon Padjasek: 5 Albums That Changed My Life

Photo by Giulia McGauran

Aussie metalcore outfit Northlane recently released their fifth studio album, Alien, an intense record that delves into frontman Marcus Bridge’s violent upbringing living with drug-addicted parents. In keeping with the heavy music and even heavier themes of the LP, we caught up with bassist-vocalist (and ex-Structures frontman) Brendon Padjasek to find out what albums changed his life — and, no surprise, there’s plenty of heaviness to be found.

Structures – All of the Above

Structures was my band before Northlane. If this album didn’t happen, I never would have toured, never would have met Northlane and again, wouldn’t be answering these questions.

Brand New- Déjà Entendu

For a teenager, growing up in an era where emo was at its prime, the lyrics and songwriting were so well done. Brand New is the only band of that era that I can listen to now and still think, “Yeah, those are great songs.”

Between the Buried and Me – Alaska

This was the first album I listened to that made me thing anything was possible. Really opened up my musical palette of notes, chords and time signature. Of course, I had no knowledge of theory at that point, but I don’t think I would have been interested in eventually learning if it weren’t for this album.

Meshuggah – Nothing

I remember one of my first jams with Structures. Andrew, our drummer, had put “Rational Gaze” on after we had smoked a joint and it completely changed my life. I don’t think any album made me realize the rhythmic possibilities like this one.

Robert Johnson – King of the Delta Blues Singers

Where do I even start? If you’ve heard the legend of the crossroads, you know Robert Johnson. He is said to be father of blues and rock and roll. He was a terrible player, disappeared for a year and came back with a seven-string guitar — he had fashioned an extra string on his guitar — and changed music forever. This is where the crossroads theory came from.